Race Recap: HFHM Part II

Wet. Puddles. Rain. Mud. Hiiiiiiillllls. Fun.

I suppose I’ve waited too long to give this race a proper recap. It was hard, but silly. The environment was stellar. My husband was with me to push me — and I didn’t get TOO mad at him for it. The river was rising to scare me, and for the first time ever at a race, I knew several of the volunteers. Can’t express how much more fun it is when your kids’ rock climbing guru is there to give you a hearty high-five and a cheer when you’re halfway up only just ONE of the hills that seem to go on for miles. Or how fun it is to sprint down them.

I’ve had writer’s block since this race. In the days leading up to and after it, I had some personal stuff going on that made my mind foggy and challenged me in many ways. The race was an accomplishment, it was fun and I want to do it again. But I had other stuff that trumped that and made me question everything. When it comes to running, that meant finding the clarity to be able to say, “You know what, I don’t want to spend the rest of this summer doing hours-long training runs in the heat!”

So, I have slacked way off on running, spent more time contemplating the future. We backed out of the Miner’s Lady race, which is coming up on Saturday. I’ve never quit a race before it started. The name pulled me in immediately, but I can’t fool myself into thinking I’m an endurance runner … yet. Not sure I want to be.

So … this turned into not much of a race recap, but now that I’ve broken the dam, hopefully I can get back to sharing our adventures more regularly. We’ve had some great ones this summer!

Coolest medal ever, right?! I want to wear it as a necklace!

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Great Greenbrier River Race 2018

So it’s been a full week since this year’s GGRR – a run, paddle, bike triathlon held in Marlinton, W.Va., on the Greenbrier River Trail and Greenbrier River. It’s hard to believe that just one year ago this race seemed like such a big new challenge and now it feels like a staple of our family calendar. Last year my husband and I trained for this race by running and biking as much as we could – weather doesn’t really permit us to paddle before the date of the race! On the day of the race last year our parents took the kids downtown to watch al the festivities and cheer us on. Something struck a chord with our oldest son right away. He’d had his own kayak already for a season or two and takes naturally to the water. He REALLY wanted in on this race.

We talked about being a family team this year from that point on, but the rules are a little funny and as a team we can’t do the race together. So we decided to all sign up as solo competitors and each complete the entire race. We would stay together and help him through at his pace.Tucker is 8 1/2 and this was the first race he’s ever signed up for. We did some couch to 5k runs, but really only just a few times, so he didn’t do much training at all.

But he finished the entire thing! Running was super hard for him, he got side stitches almost immediately and struggled but was determined and ran as much as he could. By Craig’s watch we finished the run portion in roughly 40 minutes – running across that mat to our boats I got really emotional because my son was being so brave and tough – just that part was a huge accomplishment. On our boats we faced the wind and moved slow, but Tucker was having an awesome time. We finally made it to our bikes and by that point I think we were behind all the other racers. We got on our bikes and made it a few easy miles before Tucker really started to wear out. He started breathing fast and losing his composure, saying he was too tired and he couldn’t do it several times. Craig cheered him on, and he continued to struggle. Finally I made him stop his bike for a pep talk – we had I think 4 miles left of the 10, and I explained that he would be so proud if he just kept going but it would feel awful to give up now – he was almost there! He looked straight ahead and started peddling his heart out. I turned a Fall Out Boy playlist on on my phone and rode beside him, and we finally rounded the corner back into town a little while later. I don’t think he could believe his eyes! And once again I was all tears. He’d never done a 5K before but managed to do one (in close to the same time as when I ran my first 5 years ago!), then paddle for 4 miles, then ride his bike for 10 more!

Just last year I took this challenge super seriously and now he had conquered it. We were the last finishers, but he was the only 8 year old to complete the entire race. Tucker sat down right away, and we got him some food and lemonade and he bounced back to life almost immediately – and said he would do it again next year!

I later found the race director to confirm that he was the youngest finisher, which she did, and she gave me a 1st place coffee mug for him and said the were proud and expect him back next year. You should’ve seen him when I awarded him with that cup back at our truck in front of all our family. The whole thing was such an emotional experience, and I’m so glad we went for it.

Notes about the race: they have the best atmosphere of any race I’ve done. The whole town participates, they do a fun warm up pre-race, the food is amazing. Love this event so much. One weird thing I don’t understand is the timing. The men start, followed 5 minutes later by teams and then 5 more minutes later by women, and your timing chip doesn’t account for the different start times really. Each year we’ve started with the teams wave so we could run together and our times have been incorrect. A plus, is this year we didn’t even show in the results at all, but when I emailed an inquiry they fixed it within maybe an hour and emailed me back right away.

That evening we celebrated our littlest boy’s 4th birthday to round out the weekend. We love this little getaway, and I think it’s officially a family tradition.

Thoughts on Boston

The Boston Marathon bombing happened the year I started running. At that point I didn’t really consider myself a runner. I definitely didn’t follow marathons. This year for the first time somehow I found myself googling results and reading profiles of the winners and tracking a few locals who I knew were running.

So many impressive stories came out of that windy, cold, rainy race this year! Des and the other top American women were such awesome examples of perseverance and hard work and dreams coming true. I also followed “Fat Girl Running” author Mirna Valerio as she posted of her own dreams.

All super inspiring! And it’s gotten me to thinking about my own goals. Way back when I started I had pretty simple goals – lose weight, be able to keep up with my kids. I later made a bigger list: run a 5k, run 5 miles, run a 10-minute mile, run for a full hour. I’ve checked off all those goals and more in the past five years. I’ve set new ones. Some have eluded me. I can honestly say the Boston Marathon has never even been a consideration. So what is my goal now? What am I shooting for? I feel like I spend every day trying to figure that out.

Since my “fitness journey” began I have crossed paths with so many other people who are also figuring out their own goals and making progress in many different ways, from getting to the Boston Marathon to raking in major dough selling shakes. I never wanted fitness to take over my life, and it definitely hasn’t. There are many ways I could improve … things I beat myself up about for not doing more successfully. But I also don’t want to quit or drop out of the game simply because I haven’t always given 100 percent. I see a lot of people who don’t ever sign up for the race because they feel like they won’t do it fast enough — and where’s the accomplishment in that?

So I keep making goals. They change and evolve. I don’t always achieve them.

This year at least in part it’s to run more often, consistently and farther: more miles versus faster ones. I am signed up for a half in May and for an endurance run in July. But I feel like the goals closest to my heart don’t necessarily have to do with running at all. I want to say yes to more things, experience all that I can and include my family whenever possible. My boys are now doing rock climbing, which I also tried for the first time. With warmer weather kayak/canoeing and backpacking season is coming I want to get out on the river in new spots and backpack with my family, truly backpack, for the first time. With my youngest of three boys turning 4 next week, I feel like I’m standing at the starting line of countless new possibilities.

I accidentally ran across a book at the library that outlines different trips along the Potomac River. We’d done a few of the chapters with regularity over the past years and my husband and I are very excited about tackling as much as we can of the rest this year. We’ve looked at a few other trails we might be able to do on bikes, too.

Long story short I am not the personality or physique to become a top runner and I know that. I enjoy just the doing, just crossing the finish line, just trying. And after Boston Marathon week, I needed to take a moment to remind myself that I’m actually right where I want to be and with more patience and more work, I can go wherever I want to go from here.